Git Submodules, the Forbidden Art

So git submodules aren’t really all that complicated, but because they’re wrapped in mystery and intrigue (much like rebase and reflog), they tend to be a bit less well understood. As any long-time readers of this blog will immediately guess, I’m going to say that’s mostly because submodules are merely unfamiliar, rather than being complicated. […]

TechEd and IP Addresses

I’m starting to move more into the area of tech-focused micromaterials, and this is part of a large shift towards a focus on TechEd. Does that term already exist? I googled around a bunch and couldn’t find any association with the way I’m using it, so I’m just gonna keep using it until somebody is […]

Computers like words too!

This isn’t about a micromaterial per se, but more about the data used to create micromaterials. I was reading an excellent blog post about word lists, and wondered how many of them were accessible in formats other than excel spreadsheets. I soon found out that a lot of them were actually in pdfs (notoriously difficult to […]

A Visual Math Micromaterial

mathbuffet.party Thinking about different ways to manifest micromaterials, I decided to make one that would have helped me a bunch, back when I was learning about simple linear equations. The definition of a linear equation: y = mx + b is simple enough…but what does it really mean? Understanding that the “m” is equal to […]

Rhyme Time (even offline)!

source code on github Finally! Back to my roots of language-based micromaterials! During a perhaps unwise move to completely change stacks, deployment pipelines, and other fun technical stuff, my ability to work on new micromaterials like this slowed down for a bit, but I’m hoping to be back to adding to the growing list of […]

You Too Can Be A Git Night King!

Who doesn’t love bringing things back to life?!?! Now my third non-language micromaterial, this one focuses on recovering a deleted local branch in git. Essentially if you have some work that you’ve completed and pushed somewhere remotely (or it’s stored on someone else’s computer), then you can always get a copy of the work back. […]